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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
as first and foremost as a foreign policy nation security president. that was what he really loved to do. that what really met to him the most. the idea that you would have the president of the united states like barack obama, who has, in my view, actually, pragmatic and reasonable foreign policy, but for whom policy is enough, but not a priority. i think richard nixon would have great difficulty identifying with that. the second thing is, the thing which i think in common if you talk about richard nixon and ronald reagan was, obviously, they were fairly big men in their own way, in a different way, and they never would say my party, my republican party, right or wrong. what i think they would say, and reagan arian takelated well, i will not speak ill of a fellow republican. when you hear this kind inside the republican party, and when you have a crisis like that, few republican senators essentially, like that administration and focusing on tactical errors of the departed, there is something -- something that ronald reagan and richard nixon, in my view, would not be able to identify with
on foreign policy you're seeing a robust left presence. i want to go back. i think the more interesting thing here is the new coalitions forming. when you see code pink and freedom work joining together for a rally. >> that means the world is over. >> that means america has to is the up and take notice we're doing something really troubling. hopefully the president will show leadership and take accountability for it. >> in a weird way not everything has to be partisan. >> lets not go too crazy. >> not get ahead of ourselves. waiting for president obama to speak at the welcoming ceremony for new fbi director james comey. >>> former vice president dick cheney cast in a new light. we will discuss cheney doctrine and peter baker's incredibly awesome new book next on "now." ready to run your lines? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ]
supporting our foreign policy and national security objectives that we are more effectively weighing the risks and rewards of our activities that we are focused above all on threats to the american people. we need to ensure are collecting information not just because we can but because we should. because we need it for our security. so again, i won't go on too long. i think it's important top context you'llize some of these revelations to look at what the administration is doing to review our intelligence activities and to look at how we balance the need for security in this completely transformed world that we live in because of the technology advances that have occurred. and then against, as i said earlier, the clear and real privacy concerns that americans and people around the world share. >> you just mentioned that it's important for us to make sure that our intelligence gathering above all is about protecting american security and you and the president in the past have talked about the nsa really being focused on things like terrorism, proliferation of wmds. can au sure our all
states to our conduct of foreign policy, to the defense matters, to economic matters. and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> do you think the snowden leaks have hurt america's ability to defend itself? >> i do. i think he's a traitor. i hope we can catch him at some point and that he receives the justice he deserves. >> and the full interview with dick cheney going to air this afternoon on the lead with jake tapper at 4:00 p.m. eastern. you're not going to want to miss that. also want to bring in christiane amanpour in the london news room talking about the nsa, the spying, of course, the aftermath of the allies really upset about this. one thing you said earlier today that really struck us here is that you said there was a deficit of good will among u.s. allies. and that's part of the reason why they are so so frustrated and angry right now. why is there a deficit of good will among our allies? >> well, it's interesting you just played that clip of former vice president cheney. let's go back to the cheney/bush years which april pex was all the angst and anger over the unite at the iraq
to congressional arm-twisting, the big reform to incremental change and the big foreign policy ambition to cultivating head of state relationships. it means that obama has appeared to be caught unaware as controversies envelop his administration. the west wing that he runs seems more like liabilities than benefits, raising questions about how much information obama wants and how he receives it. this president doesn't seem to be as relentlessly curious about the process of government. from peter baker -- peter baker writes, those cases underscore the difficult choices in what to tell a president. aides determined that it would be inappropriate for the president to have advanced knowledge of the irs investigation. beresident should not involved in such investigations or law-enforcement cases because it could politicize them. john tuck said he was not bothered asnot as other republicans about mr. obama's not knowing about the problems with the health-care system in advance. i would never put the finger on somebody saying they should have known or might have known. what difference does it m
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct of foreign policy, to the fed's matters, to economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. we'll try to ask some of our own. >> absolutely. review on multiple fronts but what will come of it? jim sciutto, great to see you. thank you so much. >>> the obama administration is facing ongoing criticism on another front. obama care. the president'sed visors are fighting back on twitter, challenging claims millions of people could lose coverage because of the law. the administration is extending the signup window by six weeks. senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is here with the very latest. >> that signup deadline now march 31st. it had been februa
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
in charge, the foreign policy guy he's the chief executive of the united states government responsible for the irs and all the agencies under him. maybe you consider that conceptual but it's real an every time something gets screwed up out there there's a sense he may not be involved. that's not way it ought to be. we only get one guy in there and that's the chief executive and he ought to be accountable. >> chris matthews thank you so much. we'll see you tonight at 7:00 on "hardball." julie pace thank you as well. i hope you put up with me. chuck and michael steele stay with us if you can. up next superstorm sandy one year later. we revisit one of the hardest hit areas. plus senator chuck schumer on what's still need in the recovery efforts. in the coming addition joe will be taking part in a series of events to mark the upcoming publication of his brand new book "the right path." it's the right time for this book. it scares me, actually. things kick off on monday november 11th at columbia university the miller theater there. he'll sit down with jon meacham. you can get free admissio
that these programs and policies are are not trying to trying to sweepingly go after americans and look at their private communications. foreign intelligence coming in. and i trust them. and i think the american people should trust them. >> foreign intelligence court, right? the problem is yahoo and google aren't foreign, a lot of user accounts are right here in america. they are data mining it. that's what the "the washington post" found out. my point is in order to do that you need probable cause and they are not doing that first. >> or you can have a special presidential directive which they do have in certain cases. look, eric, at the end of the day. >> but that's a problem. that's my problem. a special presidential directive. it's like the executive order pen. here is where the right is. the right is in the constitution. he by passing the constitution. >> there is no question about that. >> go ahead. >> we can't have a system of government where republicans only trust the republicans. and the democrats on trust the democrats. we have to rely on congressional oversight. this is a ve
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)